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Symptoms directory Browse by Alphabetic Order
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Fever
Symptoms & Signs Index

Fever is considered a temperature above 100.4 degrees F (38 degrees C). A feverish sensation, however, may occur when the body temperature is above the average normal of 98.6 degrees F. (37 degrees C).

Fever is part of the body's own disease-fighting arsenal. Rising body temperatures apparently are capable of killing off many disease- producing organisms. For that reason, low fevers should normally go untreated. Although, if the fever is accompanied by any other troubling symptoms, you may need to see your doctor to be certain. As fevers range to 104 degrees F and above, however, there can be unwanted consequences, particularly for children. These can include delirium and convulsions. A fever of this sort demands immediate home treatment and then medical attention. Home treatment possibilities include the use of aspirin or, in children, non-aspirin pain-killers such as acetaminophen, cool baths, or sponging to reduce the fever while seeking medical help. Fever may occur with almost any type of infection of illness. The temperature is measured with a thermometer
Fainting
Terms related to Fainting:

* Blackout
* Light Headed
* Lightheadedness
* Syncope

Fainting (syncope) is the partial or complete loss of consciousness with interruption of awareness of oneself and ones surroundings. When the loss of consciousness is temporary and there is spontaneous recovery, it is referred to as syncope or, in nonmedical terms, fainting. Syncope accounts for one in every 30 visits to an emergency room. It is pronounced sin-ko-pea.

Syncope is due to a temporary reduction in blood flow and therefore a shortage of oxygen to the brain. This leads to lightheadedness or a "black out" episode, a loss of consciousness. Temporary impairment of the blood supply to the brain can be caused by heart conditions and by conditions that do not directly involve the heart.
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