• 1Sevafrica
    Empowering you intellectually, economically and spiritually
  • 2Sevafrica
    Free Business Training
  • 3Sevafrica
    eCareers Recruitment
  • 4Sevafrica
    News & gossip at your fingertips
  • 5Sevafrica
    Building Careers through education
  • 6Sevafrica
    Your guide to travel & entertainment
  • 7Sevafrica
    All the latest fashions trends
  • 8Sevafrica
    Everything you need to know about sex, love & life
  • 9Sevafrica
    Experience South Africa's finest beaches this 2010
  • 10Sevafrica
    For all the best buys online
  • 11Sevafrica
    Keeping you body, mind and spirit healthy
  • 12Sevafrica
    Technology at work
  • 13Sevafrica
    The latest beauty tips from the professionals
Open in new window
Forget Me: Google Being Flooded With Requests To Clear Online History
Forget Me: Google Being Flooded With Requests To Clear Online History

Months after Europe legalized an act to have people removed from search engine history if they want to be, biggest online search company Google has received overwhelming requests from people wanting to be erased from online search history.

The search engine has restricted access to a BBC blog posting and several British newspaper stories under a legal ruling granting people a right to be "forgotten" in search engines, it emerged on Thursday.

Google said it had received 70 000 requests since it put a form online on May 30 as a result of the ruling by the European Court of Justice.

The court said that individuals have the right to have links to information about them deleted from searches in certain circumstances, such as if the data is outdated or inaccurate.

But BBC economics editor Robert Peston complained that Google had "killed this example of my journalism" after being informed that a 2007 posting about former Merrill Lynch chairperson Stan O'Neal had been removed from certain searches in Europe.

The Guardian newspaper also said it had been notified that six links to its stories had been removed from search results, three of them about a 2010 controversy involving a now-retired Scottish Premier League referee.

The newspaper said Google gave it no reason for removing the link or a chance to appeal.

Reports in Europe late on Thursday indicated that Google restored some deleted Guardian story links to search results, indicating the California-based internet titan was refining the right-to-be-forgotten process on the go.

European news organisations have opened fire on Google for removing links to stories from search results in the name of adhering to the court order.

Mail Online, the world's biggest news site, said it had received notification that links to a story about the same Scottish referee, Dougie McDonald, had been removed from certain searches.

Other stories restricted include one about a couple caught having sex on a train, and another about a Muslim man who accused the airline Cathay Pacific of refusing to employ him because of his name.

AFP

 




Share/Bookmark


Related Articles
2010 Abuse ANC and Anni Apple Bafana Barack Britain Cape China crime Cup Dewani Eskom facebook FIFA Gaga Google Haiti HIV Internet iPad Israel Jackson Jub Malema Manchester Mandela MaNtuli matric Michael Nelson Obama of Oprah Prince Shrien SWC The tickets Tiger Transnet twitter United Winfrey Woods World Zapiro Zuma

Services

Copyright © Sevafrica 2008 | All rights reserved. | Privacy Policy | Tel: 0861-4-WOMEN (96636) | Fax: 08666 9 7773 | Email: info@SEVAFRICA.com