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The Whole New Meaning To D**k Head: Baby Foreskin To Be Used To Combat Hair Loss
The Whole New Meaning To D**k Head: Baby Foreskin To Be Used To Combat Hair Loss

When your buddy calls you a ca D**khead, he probably doesn't mean it literally, well doctors are working on making that more than just a figure of speech.

Scientists are busy on the lab carrying out an experiment to re-grow hair using a baby foreskin and follicles.

The research is not anywhere near completion but the early few steps are a success reports AFP.

 

The procedure/ experiment generated human hair in 5 of 7 animals it was tested on, according to the study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Researchers hope the technique – once it is tested more thoroughly and expanded into human trials – could be useful for women with hair loss, men in the early stages of male pattern baldness, and burn victims who need both skin and follicles.

If it’s a success this could mean the end of using hundreds of hair loss creams, lotions, oils and ointments.

The breakthrough came when researchers tried a new way to foster growth via the dermal papilla cells, which give rise to hair follicles.

In the past, these papilla would not thrive in 2D cultures in a lab dish. So taking inspiration from experiments on lab rats, whose papillae can be readily transplanted, they cloned human papillae in a 3-D tissue culture.

The tissue came from discarded infant foreskins obtained through circumcision procedures at Columbia University Medical Centre.

Infant foreskin was chosen "because it would challenge the human dermal papillae not just to contribute to hair follicles within the skin, but rather, to fully reprogram the recipient epidermis to a follicular fate," said the study.

When scientists grafted the newly grown human skin tissue complete with donated human papillae, they saw hair growth in five of seven lab animals.

The hair matched the human donor DNA and lasted at least six weeks.

Co-author Colin Jahoda, professor of stem cell sciences at Durham University, England, said the team is hopeful that clinical trials could begin soon. "We also think that this study is an important step toward the goal of creating a replacement skin that contains hair follicles for use with, for example, burn patients," he said

AFP

 

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