• 1Sevafrica
    Empowering you intellectually, economically and spiritually
  • 2Sevafrica
    Free Business Training
  • 3Sevafrica
    eCareers Recruitment
  • 4Sevafrica
    News & gossip at your fingertips
  • 5Sevafrica
    Building Careers through education
  • 6Sevafrica
    Your guide to travel & entertainment
  • 7Sevafrica
    All the latest fashions trends
  • 8Sevafrica
    Everything you need to know about sex, love & life
  • 9Sevafrica
    Experience South Africa's finest beaches this 2010
  • 10Sevafrica
    For all the best buys online
  • 11Sevafrica
    Keeping you body, mind and spirit healthy
  • 12Sevafrica
    Technology at work
  • 13Sevafrica
    The latest beauty tips from the professionals
Open in new window
Women Have Natural Defence Against Some Of The Strongest STD's
Women Have Natural Defence Against Some Of The Strongest STD's

Women appear to have a natural defence against the world's most common sexually transmitted infection, a new study says.

This natural protective barrier consists mainly of lactic acid bacteria - called lactobacilli.

The discovery could lead to new treatments for "trich," which affects an estimated 174 million women and men around the world each year, according to a journal news release.

Trich is caused by the parasite Trichomonas vaginalis or T. vaginalis. Symptoms of the infection include pain, irritation and discharge. About 50% of all people who have this condition, however, don't develop symptoms and are unaware that they are infected.

Researchers Augusto Simoes-Barbosa, of the University of Auckland in New Zealand, and colleagues examined how easily three different strains of T. vaginalis bound to vaginal cells. They repeated the process when nine different types of lactobacilli were also present.

In the vast majority of instances, lactobacilli prevented the parasite from binding to the cells. Some types of lactobacilli were better at preventing the parasite from binding to the cells than others, the study authors pointed out.

"This study reinforces the important role that our microbiomes play in health, infection and disease," they wrote. "Understanding the role that Lactobacillus plays in T. vaginalis infection/disease might reveal new therapeutic approaches, which include taking advantage of the natural probiotic activity of lactobacilli."

Via News24





Related Articles
2010 Abuse ANC and Anni Apple avatar Bafana Barack Beckham Britain Cape China crime Cup Dewani electricity Eskom facebook FIFA Gaga Google Haiti HIV Jackson John Jub Madiba Malema Manchester Mandela MaNtuli Michael Mugabe Nelson Obama of Oprah Prince Shrien SWC The tickets Tiger Town United Winfrey Woods World Zuma

Services

Copyright © Sevafrica 2008 | All rights reserved. | Privacy Policy | Tel: 0861-4-WOMEN (96636) | Fax: 08666 9 7773 | Email: info@SEVAFRICA.com